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Readers Respond: Health, Wellness Ideas and Suggestions from People With Thyroid Cancer

Responses: 53

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Updated March 08, 2011

Want to Feel Better?

I had a total thyroidectomy 7 years ago. My best advice to those of you feeling in a fog is to get your iron and calcium levels checks. Often when your levels are on the low side of normal, your doctor will be say nothing. However, when taking supplements I found I felt measurably better. In addition, it is important to work on adjusting your thyroxine levels. While many doctors will claim your levels are normal, sometimes by switching up the medications by as much as 6 or 12 micrograms can make a huge difference. I took one 125 microgram pill and then cut up another 25 microgram pill into quarters and tried different doses, and found the one which was perfect for me. All of my "feeling like I'm in a fog" systems are completely gone now that I have adjusted my thyroxine levels and got on calcium and iron supplements. This made a huge difference for me and now I feel great!
—Guest Dorothy

Life Changing Surgery

I had a total thyroidectomy 3 years ago, which put my life in a tail spin. While in recovery a blood vessel burst in my neck causing me to be rushed back into the ER for surgery. Now my endocronologist is still adjusting my Synthroid to find the right dose. I am always tired, total fog and very moody. My life has not been the same. People do not understand how life changing is it. It should be considered a disability because it does affect your entire body.
—Guest Guest Falconer

To Commemorate Thyroid Cancer Awareness

Get a "neck check". It only takes seconds and can save your life (the life you know with a thyroid). Also, check out ThyCa.
—Guest PAP

Frustrated

This month (May) I was operated and no longer have my thyroid due to cancer. I feel like I suddenly have menopause. I am irritable, hot and cold, aching absent minded and don't know if it's going to get better. 7 years ago I had half my thyroid removed due to a very large hot nodule and thought everything would be ok from then on, but I have had all sorts of issues with my health. I developed carpal tunnel and funnily enough it since my cancer was removed, I have no major pain in my wrists so that is one positive thing. I can't sleep, can't stay still and want to seriously hurt someone sometimes. I wonder if this get better? I am waiting for a letter from the hospital to see if I will have to go through I-131 and then see what I have to deal with then. I also need to go and have a breast biopsy as my first mammogram ever has turn out to be suspicious. I have 4 children - one with an acquired brain injury and he needs me - they all do.
—Alexandra46

Just Had Surgery

Just had surgery. I no longer have my thyroid and have papillary cancer. Iam waiting to see if I will need RAI. I don't know how the doctors will determine this. My tumor was 10mm and I am 47yrs.
—Guest lulu

Just Had Surgery

Just had surgery. I no longer have my thyroid and have papillary cancer. Iam waiting to see if i will need RAI. How will the drs determine this. My tumor was 10mm and I am 47yrs.
—Guest lulu

Devoid for a Decade

In 2000 I had the remainder of my thyroid removed after an earlier partial. I am thankful that God spared me and whilst I have numerous connected ailments I am otherwise blessed in my life. I live tired, have gained mass and lost my libido and don't know where I put it - yes fog too! The trouble is, when you appear normal, folks do not understand that there is an internalized, complex health challenge being waged and it is not done to verbalize this as it can affect relationships - a real dichotomy! I thank God for each day and try to maintain a positive attitude
—Skutty

Thyroid Cancer

I had a tiny papillary cancer ten years ago and my thyroid was removed. This was followed by L131 radioactive iodine. An endocrinologist I saw some years later informed me that he didn't think I should have had my thyroid removed!! A bit late!! I take Eltroxin but I can't find a doctor who understands the acceptable level for TSH after thyroid cancer. The original oncologist told me it should not go above 0.1, but every time my blood is tested the laboratory queries this low level. SURELY someone in the medical profession can advise the recommended TSH level for those who have had their thyroid removed. Is it necessary to maintain such a low level, with possible atrial fibrillation, years after surgery? I wish I knew!
—Guest Juned

Thyroid Cancer Removed

I have been on Levothyroxine (.2mg) for about 2-3 years, but lost my job on 12/10. I have not had insurance since and just ran out of my medications 4 weeks ago. I cannot afford to go to doctors to get new prescription.
—Guest bryan

I Am Well.

About 2.5 years ago, I found out I had thyroid cancer. I operated. Now I am well, but can not walk long distance without feeling weakness.
—Guest amlan

What Am Trying to Do

I was operated on. Last week, my total thyroid biopsy results state that it was a capillary cancer. I am uncomfortable with my lack of knowledge and trying to figure out what to do from here.
—Guest Dino Lumampao

Thyroid Cancer

If I could do it over again, I would not have had my thyroid removed for cancer. I can't lose weight, the endocrinologist tried to kill me and now I am allergic to all radiation, even iodine. I ended up in the emergency room with anaphylactic shock. I can't even take a regular vitamin pill that has iodine in it. I can't go out into the sun. There has got to be a better way to treat thyroid cancer other than total removal. The cure is a bigger death sentence than the disease.
—viewvalley

Do Endos have Cerebral Cortexes?

1. The thyroid gland is the regulator of ALL bodily functions. Too often, Messianic Doctors remove it mistakenly. Even if it's cancer, the nodes should be tested at least 3 times using FNA and then removed (just the nodes.) 2. Synthroid is a terrible drug. No T3, T2, or T1. We magically make our own. Some of us do not. I would wager that MOST of us do not. 3. The absolute uselessness of the TSH test is a direct assault on patients, and on 'good science' (if there is such a thing in the West.) 4. Only a doctor that uses combination therapies can return a person to health when their thyroid is gone. (Diet, naturopathy, vitamins, acupuncture, full spectrum doses of T3.) News: a TSH of 0.01 is NORMAL in a person with a non-functioning thyroid, or no thyroid at all. Use your BRAINS, Endos. 5. If some of us sound angry, it's because we are. This "one little pill a day and you'll fly off to fairyland" is junk science. Forget numbers. LOOK, LISTEN!... idiots.
—_Jessica_Williams

Levothyroxine

Since my thyroid was found to have cancer and removed, I have been on levothyroxine and I am doing great. Find the system that works for YOU and stick with it, but never stop researching!
—Guest cindy

Good Days and Bad Days

In 2002, I had my thyroid removed. I agree eating right and exercising is the only REAL way. I exercise at least 5 days a week and I maintain my weight, but I do not lose weight. I am 46 and have hit menopause. At times I just cry and can't stop. I have no support in my family because they will not read the information to see what I am going through. I agree that 1 pill can't replace what God created.
—Guest Elaine Crawford

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Health, Wellness Ideas and Suggestions from People With Thyroid Cancer

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  2. Health
  3. Thyroid Disease
  4. Cancer / Goiter / Nodules
  5. Thyroid Cancer
  6. Thyroid Cancer Patients: Health, Wellness Ideas and Suggestions from People With Thyroid Cancer

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