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Are You Depressed? Take Our Depression Quiz

Find Out if You May Be Suffering From More Than The Blues

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Updated June 11, 2014

Depressed woman with head in hands
Tom Merton/OJO Images/Getty Images
by Mary J. Shomon

Are you feeling a bit moody, have a temporary case of the blues -- or are you suffering from a clinical depression? Depression can be a symptom of thyroid disease. But, even after thyroid diagnosis and treatment, depression can sometimes continue, an unwanted side effect of coping with long-term chronic illness such as thyroid disease. Our Depression Quiz can help you see if you have some of the more common symptoms of clinical depression.

The Depression Quiz

A score under 20 is the least likely to point to a depression, 21-35 means depression is likely, over 36 means depression is very likely. This test is not designed to make a diagnosis of depression or take the place of a professional diagnosis, but may give you some insights. If you suspect that you are depressed, please consult with your doctor or a mental health professional as soon as possible, for more help and support.

Over the past two weeks, I have been felt low in energy, and not very interested in my daily activities.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have been blaming myself for things.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have a reduced ability to enjoy myself.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have had a change - increase or decrease -- in my sleeping habits or appetite.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have been feeling hopeless about the future.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have had difficulty in concentrating; indecisiveness; and slowed or fuzzy thinking.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have been feeling particularly sad, hopeless, or anxious.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have been feeling worthless.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have been feeling like there is little pleasure In my life.
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

Over the past two weeks, I have had thoughts about death or suicide. (PLEASE NOTE: If you are feeling suicidal, PLEASE contact your physician, a mental health professional, or contact a Crisis Center or hotline in your area
5 Very Frequently
4 Frequently
3 Sometimes
2 A Few Times
1 Rarely

A key question I'm regularly asked is: "Is my depression DUE to the thyroid disease -- i.e., a diagnosis of "depression secondary to hypothyroidism" -- or is it just a coincidence? Doctors do not have a definitive answer, although, according to mental health experts, "as many as 40% of clinically hypothyroid patients (mainly women) have significant depression. This is often accompanied by psychomotor slowing and mild cognitive impairment."

According to the Thyroid Society..."Most patients with hypothyroidism have some degree of associated depression, ranging from mild to severe. 10% -15% of the patients with a diagnosis of depression may have thyroid hormone deficiency. Patients with depression should be tested to determine if they have a thyroid disorder. Several research studies have been done and continue to be done on the association between depression and thyroid disease. Although all forms of depression, including bipolar disorders like manic depression, can be found in either hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, depression is more often associated with hypothyroidism. Many patients with hypothyroidism have some degree of associated depression, ranging from mild to severe."

If you have had depression along with thyroid disease, and were not being treated for your thyroid problem, then starting thyroid hormone therapy may clear up your depression. When this happens, antidepressant medication or tactics may be unnecessary, once your thyroid treatment has stabilized.

However, even after correction of hypothyroidism, many people still suffer from depression that requires further treatment. Antidepressant treatments such as conventional medications, herbal drugs, vitamin therapies, therapy, exercise, and other mind-body techniques can deal with the depression.

Mary Shomon, About.com's Thyroid Guide since 1997, is a nationally-known patient advocate and best-selling author of 10 books on health, including "The Thyroid Diet: Manage Your Metabolism for Lasting Weight Loss," "Living Well With Hypothyroidism: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know," "Living Well With Graves' Disease and Hyperthyroidism," "Living Well With Autoimmune Disease," "Living Well With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia," and the "Thyroid Guide to Fertility, Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Success." Click here for more information on Mary Shomon.
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